salim and anarkali story

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Posted: 8 years ago
friends anyone know about salim and anarkali love story .i saw in wikipedia but its confusing.y anarkali died .if anyone known please tell me Sleepy
Posted: 8 years ago
Salim and Anarkali

NO incident in the history of Mughal India enjoys so much popularity as the royal romance of Prince Salim (later Jahangir) and Anarkali. It is believed that the original name of Anarkali was Nadira or Sharfunnisa and that she received the name or the title of Anarkali (literally meaning pomegranate bud) for her beauty.
The popular version of the story runs thus. Anarkali was a dancer at the court of Emperor Akbar. The emperor's eldest son and heir apparent, Salim, fell in love with her. Akbar did not approve of the relation as the dancer was of lowly birth and hence considered not fit to be the queen of the would-be emperor of Hindustan. But the lovers did not pay heed to the emperor's disapproval. At last, Anarkali was sentenced to death " she was bricked alive in a wall. This basic story-line is variously told with minor variations in detail. However, one may be surprised to note that the name of Anarkali is not even mentioned in the historical details of the period of Akbar or in the memoirs of Jahangir.

Today many historians doubt the authenticity of the story and consider it a mere fabrication.
The believers in the story mention a tomb in Lahore which is popularly considered to be that of Anarkali. It is situated on the premises of the Punjab Civil Secretariat and now houses the Punjab Records Office. It is an octagonal building covered with a dome. At each corner of the building is an octagonal turret surmounted with a kiosk. In olden times, this building was surrounded by a garden that had at its entrance a double-storeyed gateway. But no trace of the garden survives now. The building still enshrines a beautifully inscribed monolithic sarcophagus.
On the sarcophagus are inscribed 99 names of Allah and the Persian couplet:
Ta qayamat shukr goyam kard gar khwish ra
Ah! gar man baz beenam rui yar khwish ra
(Ah ! could I behold
the face of my beloved once more;
I would give thanks unto my God
Unto the day of resurrection).
On the northern side of the sarcophagus are inscribed the words Majnun Salim Akbar i.e. "The profoundly enamoured Salim (son of ) Akbar".
The sarcophagus bears two dates also. The date given in letters as well as in numerals is 1008 hijri(1599-1600 AD). On the western side of the sarcophagus is another date 1024 hijri (1615-16 AD).
Scholar Ahsan Quraishi mentions one more inscription in the tomb which is said to have been destroyed by General Ventura, the French mercenary fighting for the Sikhs, who used the monument as his residence. The contents of this extinct Persian inscription can be translated as follows: "The innocent who is murdered mercilessly and who dies after enduring much pain, is a martyr. God considers him/her a martyr".
Although the name of Anarkali is not mentioned in any of these inscriptions but on the basis of the contents of these inscriptions, a group of scholars construe that the person buried in the memorial is no other than Anarkali. Of the two dates, the first is believed to be that of the execution of Anarkali and the second one as the date of the erection of the tomb. But this supposition cannot be correct because Akbar was not at Lahore in 1008 hijri. He had already left it for Agra in 1007 (hijri) (in November 1598). So the story about Anarkali being buried alive by the orders of Akbar cannot be correct.
The earliest writers to report the love affair of Salim were two British travellers " William Finch and Edward Terry. William Finch reached Lahore in February 1611 (only eleven years after the supposed death of Anarkali), to sell the indigo he had purchased at Bayana on behalf of the East India Company. His account, written in early seventeenth century English, gives the following information: In the suburbs of the town, a fair monument for Prince Daniyal and his mother, one of the Akbar's wives, with whom it is said Prince Salim had a liaison. Upon the notice of the affair, King Akbar caused the lady to be enclosed within a wall of his palace, where she died. The King Jahangir, in token of his love, ordered a magnificent tomb of stone to be built in the midst of a walled four-square garden provided with a gate. The body of the tomb, the emperor willed to be wrought in work of gold...
Edward Terry who visited a few years after William Finch writes that Akbar had threatened to disinherit Jahangir, for his liaison with Anarkali, the emperor's most beloved wife. But on his death-bed, Akbar repealed it.
Basing his analysis on the above two Britishers' accounts, Abraham Eraly, the author of The Last Spring: The Lives and Times of the Great Mughals, suspects that there "seems to have been an oedipal conflict between Akbar and Salim." He also considers it probable that the legendary Anarkali was nobody other than the mother of Prince Daniyal.
Eraly supports his hypothesis by quoting an incident recorded by Abul Fazl, the court-historian of Akbar. According to the historian, Salim was beaten up one evening by guards of the royal harem of Akbar. The story is that a mad man had wandered into Akbar's harem because of the carelessness of the guards. Abul Fazl writes that Salim caught the man but was himself mistaken for the intruder. The emperor arrived upon the scene and was about to strike with his sword when he recognised Salim. Most probably, the intruder was no other than Prince Salim and the story of the mad man was concocted to put a veil on the indecency of the Prince.
But the accounts of the British travellers and consequently the presumption of Eraly is falsified when one comes to know that the mother of prince Daniyal had died in 1596 which does not match the dates inscribed on the sarcophagus.
Another scholar, Muhammad Baqir, the author of Lahore Past and Present opines that Anarkali was originally the name of the garden in which the tomb was situated, but with the passage of time, the tomb itself came to be named as that of Anarkali's. This garden is mentioned by Dara Shikoh, the grandson of Jahangir, in his work Sakinat al-Auliya, as one of the places where the Saint Hazrat Mian Mir used to sit. Dara also mentions the existence of a tomb in the garden but he does not give it any name.
Muhammad Baqir believes that the so-called tomb of Anarkali actually belongs to the lady named or entitled Sahib-i Jamal, another wife of Salim and the mother of the Prince's second son Sultan Parvez, and a daughter of the noble Zain Khan Koka. This conclusion is also partially faulty. The mother of Sultan Parviz was not a daughter of Zain Khan Koka but the daughter of Khawaja Hasan, the paternal uncle of Zain Khan. Of course, subsequently, the daughter of Zain Khan was also married to Salim, on June 18, 1596.
It is recorded in Akbar Nama that Jahangir "became violently enamoured of the daughter of Zain Khan Koka. H.M. (Akbar) was displeased at the impropriety, but he saw that his heart was immoderately affected, he, of necessity, gave his consent." The translator of Akbar Nama, H. Beveridge, opines that Akbar objected to the marriage, because the Prince was already married "to Zain Khan's niece" (actually the daughter of paternal uncle of Zain Khan, and hence his sister). Akbar objected to marriages between near relations. But we do not know the date of death of the either of these two wives of Jahangir.
Noted art-historian R. Nath argues that there is no wife of Jahangir on record bearing the name or title of Anarkali to whom the emperor could have built a tomb and dedicated a couplet with a suffix Majnun. He considers it "absolutely improbable that the grand Mughal emperor would address his married wife as yardesignate himself as majnun and aspire to see her face once again. Had he not seen her enough? Obviously she was not his married wife but only his beloved, to whom he would take the liberty to be romantic and a little poetic too, and it appears to be a case of an unsuccessful romance of a disappointed lover... The prince could not save her, though it is on record that he was so unhappy with his father in this year 1599 that he defied his orders and revolted. It may be recalled that Mehrunissa (later Nurjahan Begum) was also married to Sher Afgan the same year and the young Prince was so dejected and disturbed on the failure of his two romances and annihilation of his tender feelings of love that he went as far as to defy Akbar."
Posted: 8 years ago

Anarkali and Salim: A Mughal Love Story

August 27, 2013Preet Kauranarkali and salim, anarkali love story, anarkali's tomb, bollywood, indian history, lahore, love story, Mughal architecture, mughal empire, mughal-e-azam, travel writing 11 Comments

"Emperor Akbar was so enamoured of her ravishing beauty that he named her "Anarkali", meaning "pomegranate blossom", for her flushing red complexion."

There is a mausoleum in the south of Lahore's Old City, a site of immense speculation and mystery, and, if rumours of 1611 are to be believed, the only remaining sign of a bitter argument between father and son. The mausoleum is an elegant octagonal white-washed stone building with 8 corner turrets, each topped with a domed kiosk, a masterpiece of solid masonry work of the early Mughal period.

Photo by Junaid Hussain

In the mausoleum sits an extraordinarily beautiful sarcophagus, a tomb of pure marble and exquisite workmanship, "one of the finest pieces of carving in the world", according to some 19th century scholars. This tomb is the final resting place of Anarkali, the protagonist of our great enigma, one half of our 17th century royal romance riddle, and the point where all the threads start to unravel.

On the sarcophagus are etched the 99 names of Allah. Two years, namely Hijra 1008 and 1024, are also inscribed, which correspond to AD 1599-1600 and AD 1615-1616 respectively. On the northern face of the sarcophagus is the following inscription, written in Persian:

Ta qayamat shukr goyam kard gar khwish ra

Ah! gar man baz beenam rui yar khwish ra

"Ah ! If could I behold the face of my beloved once more;

I would give thanks unto my God

Unto the day of resurrection"

Accompanying this eternal profession of love and passion is the inscription Majnun Salim Akbar which can be translated as "The profoundly enamoured Salim (son of) Akbar".

And so the plot thickens.

Key Players

There are three main characters in this love story.

  1. Anarkali
  2. Crown Prince Salim; Future Emperor Jahangir (1569 - 1627)
  3. Emperor Akbar (1542 - 1605)

The Mughal-e-Azam Version

The most popular version of Anarkali and Salim's illicit love story was immortalized in one of Bollywood's greatest epics, Mughal-e-Azam (1960), "The Emperor of the Mughals". Mughal-e-Azam was the highest-grossing film of its time and is popularly regarded today as the greatest Bollywood film of all time.

(I've seen it at least 3 times; my father, while waiting for his tea to boil, still drums out the tune to "Pyar kiya to darna kya", a song that's become a popular way of laughing off romance-related woes.)

Dilip Kumar as Prince Salim; Madhubala as Anarkali in Mughal-e-Azam (1960)

According to this version of the royal romance, popularised by the Bollywood movie, Anarkali's real name was Nadira Begum. Originally of Turkmen origin, Nadira came to Lahore with a traders' caravan. She held a mujra (dance performance) in the court of Emperor Akbar, where the latter was so enamoured of her ravishing beauty that he renamed her "Anarkali", meaning "pomegranate blossom", for her flushing red complexion.

Emperor Akbar's eldest and heir apparent, Prince Salim, fell in love with Anarkali, but his father did not approve of the relations between the two. The dancer was of low birth and not fit to be the queen of the future emperor of Hindustan. The lovers ignored Emperor Akbar's disapproval and continued to meet clandestinely. Unable to punish his own son, Akbar took his wrath out on Anarkali and sentenced her to death by being bricked alive in a wall.

(In the 1960 movie, because Indian audiences can hardly bear to see heroines die, Emperor Akbar releases Anarkali at the last minute, in exchange for banishment from the kingdom. Which really wouldn't explain the tomb in Lahore at all. Or fit with the personality of an Emperor. But never mind all these glaring discrepancies, because I don't buy this version at all.)

The Version Where Anarkali is Killed Over A Smile

A Mughal harem in the miniature style of the time.

So, the rumour in the walled city of Lahore was that Emperor Akbar had a special liking for Anarkali, as she was well-versed in poetry, literature and music, all of which were dear to the emperor.

She was admitted into the Mughal harem and became a concubine of the emperor's. It was a well-known fact that the entire court knew Anarkali was the emperor's "most favoured person".

One day, while seated in a room lined with mirrors, Emperor Akbar noticed Anarkali returning Prince Salim a smile. Akbar, who knew the character of his sensuous son better than anybody else, was outraged by the suspicion of an affair between the crown prince and his own slave girl.

In fact, Akbar was so infuriated that he ordered her to be built alive into a wall. After all, if word got out that his concubine was sleeping with his own son, the Shehenshah-e-Hindustan (King of Kings of Hindustan) would become the laughing stock of his own land. Salim, unable to save her from this cruel end, commissioned a tomb to her memory in Lahore after his accession to the throne.

(This is more in keeping with the personality of an emperor, and Akbar did have a reputation for arrogance. Besides being a delicate nest of politics, a royal harem is, after all, a symbolic manifestation of the Emperor's libido, and hence his "manliness".)

The Semi-Incestuous Version

The earliest mention in historical record of the love affair between Anarkali and Prince Salim comes from the account of one William Finch, an English merchant who arrived in India in 1608, 3 years after Prince Salim ascends the throne as Emperor Jahangir.

Finch's story, though the first, is by far the most scandalous version of the love affair between Anarkali and Prince Salim. In 17th century English, Finch notes:

"a faire monument for Don Sha [Daniyal] his mother, one of the Acabar his wives, with whom it is said Sha Selim had to do (her name was Immacque Kelle, or Pomgranate kernell); upon notice of which the King [Akbar] caused her to be inclosed quicke within a wall in his moholl, where shee dyed, and the King [Salim: Jahangir], in token of his love, commands a sumptuous tombe to be built of stone..."

So it turns out that Prince Salim was having an affair with his father's wife! Oh my, does it get much more scandalous than this? We know her name was Anarkali because Finch mentions that the mother of Prince Daniyal bears a name meaning "Pomegranate Blossom". Upon notice of the affair with the Crown Prince, she was enclosed within a wall of the palace on Emperor Akbar's orders, where she died. Later, as a token of his love, Prince Salim alias Emperor Jahangir builds a grand marble tomb in her name.

Photo by Junaid Hussain

Posted: 8 years ago

WHAT IS THE TRUTH ABOUT ANARKALI?

 

The story of love between Salim (later Emperor Jahangir) and the dancing girl Anarkali, has always enticed us. The veracity of the story has often been challenged by historians and others. Was it just a concocted story and not a part of history? Let us try to seek an answer to two important questions: (1) Did there exist a real character called Anarkali? (2) If yes, did Emperor Akbar, the father of the prince Salim, really commit the heinous act of having Anarkali entombed alive?

 

The movie Anarkali' (1953) starring Bina Rai as Anarkali and Pradeep Kumar as Prince Salim, and also the movie Mughal-e-Azam' (1962) with Madhubala as Anarkali and Dilip Kumar as Salim, are a must-see, whatever our findings about the truth of Anarkali.

 

What Akbarnama reveals

 

Babur was the first to write his own memoirs. He was a direct descendant of Timur on his father's side and of Chenghis Khan on his mother's side. Two mass murderers for ancestors could have made Emperor Babur very proud. Babur's memoirs are called Baburnama' which he wrote in his mother-tongue Chaghatai Turkic. Babur's son Humayun also wrote his own memoirs. However, Humayun's son Akbar did not write memoirs. Akbar's vizier Abul Fazl was the official historian who wrote Akbarnama' in three volumes in Persian. The last volume is known as Ain-i-Akbari and deals exclusively with administrative set-up. The first volume is about Timur, Babur and Humayun. The second volume contains the details of Akbar's reign over 46 years (1560-1605).

 

Why did not Akbar write his own memoirs? The answer lies in the fact that he was illiterate. He could not read or write. His courtiers were made to read out books for him on a variety of subjects, and Akbar had a vast library. He acquired great knowledge by hearing and listening. Some even regard Akbar as a scholar.

 

Does Akbarnama refer to Anarkali and her life and incidents anywhere? It is said that Akbarnama has made no mention of Anarkali anywhere. But then are there indirect or circumstantial references?

 

Let me quote the following excerpt I found in the Net:

 

QUOTE

The Akbarnama, the official court history of Akbar, records an incident where Akbar became angry with Salim for some reason and sent a noble to admonish him. Salim, however, complained that the noble spoke too harshly and Akbar ordered the tongue of the noble to be cut off, disregarding the fact that the unlucky man was acting on the orders of Akbar himself. If such could be the fate of a high-ranking noble caught in crossfire between the king and the prince, then imagine a slave girl.

UNQUOTE

 

 

Here is another excerpt taken by me from the Net:

 

QUOTE

It is recorded in Akbar Nama that Jahangir "became violently enamoured of the daughter of Zain Khan Koka. H.M. (Akbar) was displeased at the impropriety, but he saw that his heart was immoderately affected, he, of necessity, gave his consent." The translator of Akbar Nama, H. Beveridge, opines that Akbar objected to the marriage, because the Prince was already married "to Zain Khan's niece" (actually the daughter of paternal uncle of Zain Khan, and hence his sister). Akbar objected to marriages between near relations. But we do not know the date of death of the either of these two wives of Jahangir.

UNQUOTE

 

We can't accept anything from the Net as correct without verification. Yet, what could be inferred from the above is that there were perhaps serious differences between Akbar and Prince Salim. We are left to wonder whether Anarkali could have been the cause.

 

It is also a fact that Prince Salim usurped the throne in 1600 when Emperor Akbar was on an expedition of conquest. But Akbar successfully broke the back of this rebellion.

 

Abul Fazl was murdered on 12th August 1602 by Bir Singh Bundela, at the behest of Prince Salim who despised him. Emperor Akbar died on 27th October 1605 and Salim (Jahangir) ascended the throne on 3rd November 1605, eight days later. It is supposed that the presently existing and imposing Anarkali Tomb' in Lahore, about which we will acquaint ourselves here soon, was built by  Emperor Jahangir in the period 1605-1618.

 

JAHANGIR'S MEMOIRS

 

Emperor Jahangir wrote his own memoirs called Tuzuk-i-Jahangiri in Persian which is also called Jahangirnama. Does Jahangirnama relate anything about Anarkali at all?

 

Jahangir's reign lasted from 1605 to 1627 in which year he died. However, he gave up writing his memoirs in the seventeenth year of his reign. It will be futile for us to expect any reference to the Anarkali of the prince-Salim days in the Jahangirnama.

 

ANARKALI MAUSOLEUM IN LAHORE

 

A tomb, inside a mausoleum, believed to be that of Anarkali, exists even today at Lahore within the compound of the State Secretariat Office. It is actually an elegant, octagonal building with eight corner turrets with kiosk on top as can be seen in the adjoining picture. The building is said to house the Records Office. There is a bazaar called Anarkali Bazaar' nearby on the Mall Road and the bazaar is said to be nearly 200 years old.

 

 The "Anarkali-Mausoleum" in Lahore

 

It is seen that the tomb/sarcophagus bears certain inscriptions in Persian. The following is the translation of an inscription:

 

I would give thanks unto my God unto the day of resurrection
Ah! could I behold the face of my beloved once more

 

The following inscription is found on the northern face of the sarcophagus:

 

"majnn Salim Akbar"  which can be taken to mean "the one profoundly loved by Salim, son of Akbar"

 

Two years namely Hijra 1008 and 1024 are also inscribed which correspond to AD 1599-1600 and 1615-16. They are sometimes taken as the starting and completion years of the monument. But it would seem to us, as I believe, that such a mausoleum need not have taken 16 years to construct when the huge Taj Mahal which came up later could be constructed in 16 years (1632-48). However, it seems that some historians believe differently that AD 1599 was the year of death (live entombment) of Anarkali and the year 1615-16 was the year of completion of the construction of the mausoleum. It is believed by many that Salim revolted against his father in 1600 due to his anger and grief.

 

Many of those who believe in Anarkali-story believe that her real name was Nadira Begum who lived in Lahore and became a courtesan in Akbar's Court in Lahore. It was Akbar who was smitten by her beauty first and gave her the name "Anarkali" (pomegranate-blossom) in recognition of her beauty. It is recognized that Emperor Akbar was infatuated with her. That is why he could not stand Salim's relationship with her.

 

Going through the Internet one can get thoroughly confused by seeing the conflicting views, suppositions, assumptions, inferences and findings of several historians, scholars, writers and others on the Anarkali matter. One view is that Akbar himself ordered the construction of the Anarkali mausoleum after the entombment. Another view is that Anarkali died of some illness during Akbar's campaign outside Lahore and he ordered the construction of the mausoleum after his return. There is one view that the mausoleum was erected for one of Salim's wives (named Sahab-e-Jamal) who died in Lahore. One view is that the tomb was for one of Akbar's wives who became the mother of Prince Daniyal.

 

SHIFTING CAPITAL OF AKBAR

 

Babur's capital was initially Kabul but he shifted the capital to Agra four years before his death in 1530. His son Humayun's capital too was Agra but thanks to the wars with Sher Shah Suri, Humayun retreated to Lahore and eventually made his way back and settled at Delhi in 1555.

 

Akbar who came to the throne in 1556 shifted the Moghul capital from Delhi to Agra first, and then his capital shifted to Fatehpur Sikri from 1571 to 1585. In 1585, Akbar shifted his capital to Lahore for reasons perhaps not recorded in Akbarnama but for suspected and alleged lack of water at Fatehpur Sikri. Akbar's capital remained Lahore from 1585 to 1599 when he shifted to Agra where he died in 1605 after which Salim took over.  

 

The shifting-capital is a useful perspective when we come across the views that Anarkali died in 1599. That year was the year when Akbar shifted his capital from Lahore to Agra from where he ruled till his death in 1605. It looks like a possibility that soon after  Anarkali's death, the shifting away from Lahore took place. It is unthinkable that Akbar would have ordered the construction of the Mausoleum in Lahore. It is very much possible that Jahangir ordered the mausoleum which was finished in 1615-16.  

 

EVIDENCE OF FINCH AND TERRY

 

It is said that the evidence of Salim's love affair could be garnered from the accounts of two British travelers named William Finch and Edward Terry.

 

William Finch was a Londoner who secured a job with the East India Company. He landed at Surat along with the famous Captain William Hawkins on 24th August 1608. He spent four years in India and wrote extensively about his observations. Finch joined Hawkins in Agra, travelling from Surat, on 14th April 1610. From Agra he went to Biyana to buy indigo for the East India Company. From there he proceeded to Lahore arriving there in February 1611 and it is at Lahore that he heard of the accounts of Anarkali which went into his journal.

 

I cannot get to see Finch's writings. So I shall quote from what others have stated (rightly or wrongly) supposedly on the basis of Finch's accounts as I garnered from the Internet:

 

QUOTE No.1

It is now believed that Anarkali was in her forties or older when she was suspected of having an affair with the heir apparent, Prince Salim, who was then in the thirtieth year of his life and father to at least three sons from numerous wives. Salim's father, the otherwise enlightened Emperor Akbar, found out and ordered Anarkali to be buried alive.

Why? Because she was Akbar's concubine too, and the mother of 27-year-old Danial (Salim's youngest brother) " at least according to the British traveller William Finch, who visited Lahore in 1608, three years after Prince Salim ascended the throne as Emperor Jahangir. "The King (Jahangir), in token of his love, commands a sumptuous tomb to be built of stone in the midst of a four-square garden richly walled, with a gate and diverse rooms over it," wrote William Finch. His travelogue survived, along with accounts by fellow travellers and later historians. So did the tomb itself.

UNQUOTE

 

 

QUOTE No.2

William Finch reached Lahore in February 1611 (only eleven years after the supposed death of Anarkali), to sell the indigo he had purchased at Bayana on behalf of the East India Company. His account, written in early seventeenth century English, gives the following information:

 

In the suburbs of the town, a fair monument for Prince Daniyal and his mother, one of the Akbar's wives, with whom it is said Prince Salim had a liaison. Upon the notice of the affair, King Akbar caused the lady to be enclosed within a wall of his palace, where she died. The King Jahangir, in token of his love, ordered a magnificent tomb of stone to be built in the midst of a walled four-square garden provided with a gate. The body of the tomb, the emperor willed to be wrought in work of gold...

UNQUOTE

 

QUOTE No.3

It was a half-smile that sealed the fate of Anarkali. Sealed it in brick and mortar.

She was the finest flower in Emperor Akbar's harem, and was felicitously named after pomegranate blossom. The story is that Akbar once caught her exchanging a flirtatious smile with his son, Salim, and, enraged, ordered her to be entombed alive. This poignant medieval tale, celebrated in literature, folklore and films, even today flavours the romantic sensibility of Indians.

Did the incident really happen? There is a high probability that it did. The earliest record of it is in the journal of William Finch, an English merchant who arrived in India in 1608, within three years of Akbar's death, and stayed on here for three years. During this time he visited Lahore, where he says he saw "a faire monument for Don Sha [Daniyal] his mother, one of the Acabar his wives, with whom it is said Sha Selim had to do (her name was Immacque Kelle, or Pomgranate kernell); upon notice of which the King [Akbar] caused her to be inclosed quicke within a wall in his moholl, where shee dyed, and the King [Salim: Jahangir], in token of his love, commands a sumptuous tombe to be built of stone... ." The incident is not mentioned by any other contemporary writer, but is recorded three generations later by Khafi Khan, a chronicler of Aurangzeb.

UNQUOTE

However, it appears that Prince Daniyal's mother died in 1596 as per historical records and not in 1599. So, was Finch correct about the lady's identity? But could Finch have written anything other that what he was told then by others?

Now, let us turn our attention to the other British traveler Edward Terry.

Edward Terry did his M.A. in 1614 and became a Church priest. He came to India to work as chaplain to Sir Thomas Roe. He travelled in India and wrote "Voyage to East India, 1616-19".

Let me quote here excepts from Internet browsing as to alleged observations of Rev. Edward Terry:

 

QUOTE No.1

Edward Terry who visited a few years after William Finch writes that Akbar had threatened to disinherit Jahangir, for his liaison with Anarkali, the emperor's most beloved wife. But on his death-bed, Akbar repealed it.

UNQUOTE

Did Terry use the word "Anarkali"? Internet could be tricky about real facts. Now, let me confess to my inability to get more of relevant quotes from the ocean called Internet!

It will be necessary to go through the original writings of Finch and Terry to get a finer approximation to the truth of Anarkali. I should be surprised if none had done that. It is time for me to conclude!

IN CONCLUSION

Based on the above, I can only do my own wild-guessing on the Anarkali matter. The so-called Anarkali Tomb is there in Lahore and there is an ancient Anarkali Bazaar, the oldest bazaar in South Asia, nearby. Based on "there is no smoke without fire" I would personally conclude that "Anarkali" was not fictitious. And it is quite clear that daddy Akbar and sonny Salim were lost on one woman. Abul Fazl could have avoided sour family facts in his historical accounts for obvious reasons. It is not thinkable that Akbar would have given Anarkali a secret exit from the burial chamber. This would be too tame for a proud and egoistic Emperor. Besides, the tomb is a reminder of the burial.

Posted: 8 years ago

Salim and Anarkali


The love story of Salim and Anarkali is a story that every lover knows. It is one of the most tragic love stories known to people. The Mughal prince Salim falling for a courtesan Anarkali is the kind of stuff that legends are made of. The relationship of Salim and Anarkali outraged the Mughal emperor Akbar to the extent that both father and son decided to go on war. However, as all great love stories are associated with a disastrous ending, the love affair of Salim and Anarkali did blossom, only to meet a tragic fate. It has been rightly said that only those love stories are remembered which end in a catastrophe, and such has been the fortune of Salim and Anarkali.

Love Story Of Salim & Anarkali
The son of the great Mughal emperor Akbar, Salim, fell in love with an ordinary, but beautiful courtesan Anarkali. Anarkali was known for her dancing skills, as much as for her beauty. Salim was mesmerized by her beauty and fell in love as soon as he saw her. But, the emperor could not digest the fact that his son was in love with an ordinary courtesan. He started pressurizing Anarkali and devised all sorts of tactics to make her fall in the eyes of the young, love-smitten prince. When Salim came to know of this, he declared a war against his own father. But the mighty emperor's gigantic army proved too much for the young prince to handle. He was defeated and sentenced to death.

This was when Anarkali intervened and renounced her love to save her beloved from the jaws of death. She was entombed alive in a brick wall, right in front of her lover's eyes. Some people, however, say that she did not die. The tomb was constructed on the opening of a secret tunnel unknown to Salim. It is said she escaped through that tunnel and fled the place, never to return again. Thus, ended the tragic love story of Salim and Anarkali. However, Salim lived on to become Emperor Jahangir, who loved Anarkali throughout his life and remembered only her when he was dying.

A tomb that is believed to be of Anarkali, is located in the premises of Punjab Civil Secretariat in Lahore and now houses the Punjab Records Office. The tomb was previously transformed to a church by an invading British officer. There is also a market located at a near by road, The Mall road, which is famously known as the Anarkali Bazaar. It is believed to the one of the oldest markets in Pakistan. While no one knows whether Anarkali actually existed or not, her legend is still alive in millions of hearts across Indian and Pakistan.
Posted: 8 years ago
Thanks for replying. . Smile
Posted: 8 years ago
I hate akbar y he do this to innocent Anarkali. . Cry Angry
Posted: 8 years ago
but dont u feel it is awkward if salim dated akbars concubine ? 

Salim


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