OS: Tere Mere darmiyan hain baatein ankahi

shareShare facebook twitter
Posted: 1 months ago

Hi Everyone!! My first write-up in this forum. Hope you like it. Let me know. 

@Dreamzz - thank you so much for suggesting the topic. I didn't want to plunge directly into the scene of Vidhi not coming to the office so started from this point. 


Tere mere darmiyaan hain baatein ankahi

Tu wahaan hai main yahaan Kyun saath hum nahin

Faisley jo kiye Faasley hi mile

Raahein judaa kyun ho gayi

Na tu ghalat, na main sahi

Le ja mujhe saath tere Mujhko na rehna saath mere


Dev couldn’t help but smile ruefully at the song that was playing in his car music system. It seemed to depict his state of mind perfectly. He and Vidhi had finally managed to calm Ruhi down. The little one had a light dinner and was off like a light the minute her head touched the pillow. He only hoped no nightmares disturbed her hard-found reassurance. After all, he knew all about nightmares, didn’t he? He had gone straight home from the court the previous evening. His ma had smothered him with hugs and comfort food. He had been so tired that he had eaten whatever had been put before him, dunked himself under the shower and hit the bed, relief crashing through him for the first time in 24 hours. He had expected to sleep through the alarm but instead there had been no need for any alarm. His nightmares had done the job perfectly. 


His fingers tightened over the steering wheel involuntarily as his mind hurled back to those recurring nightmares that kept jerking him awake all night. Vidhi behind bars, terrified, crying, arms reaching out to him, beseeching him to help her, cops dragging her away, one of them ordering to put his Vidhi in solitary confinement. The dreams were all garbled and disjointed but the terror and helplessness he’d felt had been vivid. So vivid. It had felt like someone was flaying him alive while sharp nails clawed his insides.

 

“Tumne jab galat kiya hi nahi toh tumhare saath bura nahi hoga”


He scoffed as he recalled his own words to Vidhi when she’d been behind the bars. He knew better than anyone that the world didn’t work that way. It never worked that way. But at that time if he had to say that the moon was made of blue cheese and the sky was bright red to get that petrified look off her eyes then he would have gladly said that too.


He shook his head. It was all over now, he told himself. Vidhi was back home. She was safe. 

With his right hand still on the steering wheel, he glanced at his left palm, his fingers closing into a light fist. He could still feel her soft palm gently sliding through his, her fingers gripping his palm with surprising firmness. And when he’d looked at her, those eyes had been full of relief, hope, trust and love. So much love! And in that moment, he lost himself in those eyes. With her palm firmly holding his, he felt…complete. Like he hadn’t known that there was a part of him that was missing and now suddenly it was there, slotting itself perfectly into him, completing him. 


That feeling was what had retained his sanity through the night and it stayed with him all through the day when his staff celebrated their case dismissal. It stayed until Vidhi once again mentioned about letting her parents know. With a sigh of impatience, he parked the car in front of his house and strode inside. 


“Dev?” Satyavati came down the stairs, a slightly concerned frown marring her forehead. “You are late getting home today. Everything OK?” 


Dev was quick to paste a smile. “Haan ma. Sab teek. Mein-mein woh… mein woh buss… baal ghar… haan baal ghar gaya tha. Woh Ruhi haina…woh thodi ghabrayi hue thi toh…” 


Satyavati nodded sympathetically even as her eyes held a hint of laughter. “Akele gaye the baal ghar? Mujhe bulaliya hota!”


“Haan…nahi! Matlab…akele- akele nahi gaya tha. Vidhi… Vidhi bhi chali thi mere saath.” Suddenly giving up on his attempt to converse, he stepped back. “Ma, I’m tired. We’ll talk tomorrow?” 


“Dev?”  His feet halted. “Kya hua beta? Kuch baat hue Vidhi se?” 


Satyavati watched her son battle with himself, trying to suppress the words that were bursting to get out. But she was his mother. She could outwait him when it mattered. Finally, his shoulders slumped as he lost the battle. “She wants to tell her parents,” he growled, his abrasive tone low. Frustrated. 


Satyavati’s eyes lit up. She held his arm eagerly. “Sach? Usne aisa kaha tujhse?”


“Woh-woh meri baat nahi maan rahi hain ma! Buss bolti hain ki samajh jayenge! Aise-aise thodi na hota hain!” He shook his head in frustrated despair.


“Kyu nahi hosakta Dev? If she wants to talk to her parents, that means she is sure about herself, her feelings for you. Aur kya pata…”


“Ma, now you’re daydreaming too?” He scoffed. “In what world would a parent…any parent accept such a thing?” 


“Dev, koshish toh karni chahiye na. Warna…”


“Warna kya ma? Mein bol bolke thak gaya hoon ki iss rish…yeh-yeh jo bhi hain, uss…usmein koi future nahi hain.” But for the first time, he couldn’t utter those words with conviction. The gentle smile of his mom attested to that. “Ma, I’m tired. We… We’ll talk tomorrow, OK? Goodnight.” 


Satyavati watched her son walk away. “Future hain, Dev. Yeh tu bhi jaanne laga hain. Dikhraha hain mujhe. Buss tumhe uss future ki taraf apne kadam badhana hain.” 


Dev’s plans to catch some shut eye flew out of the window by the time he came out of the shower and saw 2 missed calls from Vidhi. Frowning, he called her back. She answered almost before it began ringing. “Vidhi? Kya hua? Sab teek?”


“S-sir… s-sir…woh…papa… mere papa…sir…” 


“Vidhi, Vidhi! Calm down! Just calm down. Bolo kya hua!” He made his tone as soothing as possible under the circumstances because his gut was screaming at him that whatever it was, it was not good. 


“S-sir mere papa…unhe kuch hogaya hain. W-woh behosh hogaye hain. A-ambulance bulaya hain…”


“OK, OK. Relax. Hua kya tha usse pehle?”


“Woh…unko pata chalgaya ki…m-mein aap…matlab aap aur mein…”


Dev squeezed his eyes shut. Dammit! Dammit all to hell! He bloody told her not to open her mouth. Not to say anything. “Vidhi, I told you…”


“N-nahi, meine kuch nahi bataya…matlab bataya lekin…meine nahi bataya. Un-unhonne poocha toh…”


If there was one thing that Dev Raichand was good at, it was setting priorities and following through them. “OK, meri baat suno ab. I’m sending you the name of the hospital. Tell the ambulance guy to take your papa there. Are you listening to me? I know the doctors there. I’ll call and tell them to expect you. They will take care of him. Nothing will happen. Suna tumne Vidhi? Kuch nahi hoga tumhare papa ko. Mein hoon na. Sab sambhal loonga.”


“N-nahi sir.” He could almost see her shaking her head rapidly, wiping her tears with the back of her hand. “Woh badi hospital hogi na…matlab hum kaise…how do I…”


The nerve ticking at his jaw was the only sign of his eroding temper. “Vidhi, this is not the time to think about that. I said I will…” He exhaled, his mind functioning at warp speed. “You are my employee. Employees and their family have health insurance in our company. You know that.” He could hear the ambulance siren in the background. “Go now.”


She disconnected the call without saying anything further. He pushed that to the back of his mind as he made the calls to the hospital and talked to the doctors and later to the HR team to make sure the insurance papers were updated and in place. He told them to send the copies to Vidhi and coordinate with the hospital admin. 


“Don’t worry sir. We’ll handle it,” he assured. 


“Thank you. And if any part of the treatment is not covered by our policy, don’t mention it to Vidhi now. We’ll deal with it later, OK? Keep me updated.”


“Sure sir.” 


Throwing the phone aside on the bed, he went to stand at the window. 


“Aap bhagwaan banke aaye hain Dev saab, Vidhi keliye!” 


He recalled Hari Prasad’s words. I’m sorry, Hari Prasad ji. Mein bhagwaan nahi, ek shraap banke aaya hoon aapki beti ki zindagi mein. I’m so sorry. 


“Agar koi cheez mumkin hain toh woh hain humaara saath hona!” 


Vidhi’s words resonated. He shook his head. 


Nahi Vidhi, yeh mumkin nahi hain. Ab toh tumhe bhi yakeen hojaayega ki yeh mumkin nahi hain. You will now let go of this…whatever it is in your heart. You will let go of me. It’s the right thing to do. The only thing to do. They are your parents. What parent would accept this? They live in a society. And society… society would forever mock and ridicule things that are not as per the pre-set norms. 


He looked at his left palm, felt her palm sliding through his, entwining them together. How stupid was he! How could he, for even one moment, forget that he had no right to want…to hope? He was not a teenager, was he? Not a young man full of youthful optimism, was he? No. He had no right to hope. Not with her. Not with his Vidhi. No. Not His Vidhi. Just Vidhi. She is not his to claim. Why did he forget that? Because he did forget. Even as he mouthed the facts to Vidhi and his ma, he did forget. Somewhere inside his heart, he began to hope. To think that maybe it is possible. Maybe it would work out. Maybe he could have her all to himself. All those smiles, that guileless laughter, that eager exuberance, all that love that seemed to surround and drown him whenever he felt her near him… all to himself. Him alone. 


Dev Raichand has become senile and stupid, he concluded. 


Stretching out on the bed, he closed his tired eyes. But his mind refused to stay silent. She didn’t say anything before ending the call. Was this the last time he would be hearing her voice? Had today been the last time he would ever see her? It wouldn’t be, right? She has a job. She accepted the scholarship. He would get to see her. Yes, he would, he massaged his chest, trying to reassure his heart. OK, maybe not at close quarters. She wouldn’t be coming to his cabin at every little chance she got. Her face wouldn’t light up whenever she spotted him. Her eyes wouldn’t adore him whenever he said or did something the least bit good or helpful. But still…he would be able to see her. It would be enough. It would HAVE to be. But what if she never came back? What if today had indeed been the last time he saw her? 


A lone tear trickled down to the side of his forehead, disappearing in his salt-pepper hair. “Don’t go, Vidhi!” The still, silent night was the only one that heard his agonized whimper. 


Le ja mujhe saath tere Mujhko na rehna saath mere

Posted: 1 months ago

I don't know many people here. Have tagged the ones I have been interacting with. Please feel free to tag others. 

Thank you.  

Posted: 1 months ago

Hey, 

You have written it so beautifully.. that by the end of this write up i am having that 'congested chest' wala feeling, you have succeeded in conveying Dev's fears, pain, loneliness. Thank you for writing this ..🙌🥺

Posted: 1 months ago

i made the jail wala vm on this song. smiley17

nice OS. smiley20

Edited by Angel_Shweta - 1 months ago
Posted: 1 months ago

Rula diya yaar. I can't even tell you what I am feeling now after reading this emotional piece. It was so apt portrayal of Dev's feelings to its purity at the level best. There could not be a conclusion regarding the barriers which Dev is gonna face, his fear, his deeper desires, his worries over Vidhi , his guilt feeling that he is not a teenager all were showcased so well by you . Much much much better than the faaltu things which I used to write here. Believe me I am not good in words and without thinking much I started writing here and it's because of the love and trust this forum people are giving I am trying at least a little. You are so professional writer and the wordings which you execute shows the skill of your writing talent. Thanks a lot for showing the realistic Dev here and very much thank you that you fullfilled my wish to read an OS from you. Love you dear ❣️

Posted: 1 months ago

galat telly addict ko tag kiya... i am in a meeting.. will be back to read in somw time

Posted: 1 months ago

Originally posted by Suvika.


Hi Everyone!! My first write-up in this forum. Hope you like it. Let me know. 

@Dreamzz - thank you so much for suggesting the topic. I didn't want to plunge directly into the scene of Vidhi not coming to the office so started from this point. 


Tere mere darmiyaan hain baatein ankahi

Tu wahaan hai main yahaan Kyun saath hum nahin

Faisley jo kiye Faasley hi mile

Raahein judaa kyun ho gayi

Na tu ghalat, na main sahi

Le ja mujhe saath tere Mujhko na rehna saath mere


Dev couldn’t help but smile ruefully at the song that was playing in his car music system. It seemed to depict his state of mind perfectly. He and Vidhi had finally managed to calm Ruhi down. The little one had a light dinner and was off like a light the minute her head touched the pillow. He only hoped no nightmares disturbed her hard-found reassurance. After all, he knew all about nightmares, didn’t he? He had gone straight home from the court the previous evening. His ma had smothered him with hugs and comfort food. He had been so tired that he had eaten whatever had been put before him, dunked himself under the shower and hit the bed, relief crashing through him for the first time in 24 hours. He had expected to sleep through the alarm but instead there had been no need for any alarm. His nightmares had done the job perfectly. 


His fingers tightened over the steering wheel involuntarily as his mind hurled back to those recurring nightmares that kept jerking him awake all night. Vidhi behind bars, terrified, crying, arms reaching out to him, beseeching him to help her, cops dragging her away, one of them ordering to put his Vidhi in solitary confinement. The dreams were all garbled and disjointed but the terror and helplessness he’d felt had been vivid. So vivid. It had felt like someone was flaying him alive while sharp nails clawed his insides.

 

“Tumne jab galat kiya hi nahi toh tumhare saath bura nahi hoga”


He scoffed as he recalled his own words to Vidhi when she’d been behind the bars. He knew better than anyone that the world didn’t work that way. It never worked that way. But at that time if he had to say that the moon was made of blue cheese and the sky was bright red to get that petrified look off her eyes then he would have gladly said that too.


He shook his head. It was all over now, he told himself. Vidhi was back home. She was safe. 

With his right hand still on the steering wheel, he glanced at his left palm, his fingers closing into a light fist. He could still feel her soft palm gently sliding through his, her fingers gripping his palm with surprising firmness. And when he’d looked at her, those eyes had been full of relief, hope, trust and love. So much love! And in that moment, he lost himself in those eyes. With her palm firmly holding his, he felt…complete. Like he hadn’t known that there was a part of him that was missing and now suddenly it was there, slotting itself perfectly into him, completing him. 


That feeling was what had retained his sanity through the night and it stayed with him all through the day when his staff celebrated their case dismissal. It stayed until Vidhi once again mentioned about letting her parents know. With a sigh of impatience, he parked the car in front of his house and strode inside. 


“Dev?” Satyavati came down the stairs, a slightly concerned frown marring her forehead. “You are late getting home today. Everything OK?” 


Dev was quick to paste a smile. “Haan ma. Sab teek. Mein-mein woh… mein woh buss… baal ghar… haan baal ghar gaya tha. Woh Ruhi haina…woh thodi ghabrayi hue thi toh…” 


Satyavati nodded sympathetically even as her eyes held a hint of laughter. “Akele gaye the baal ghar? Mujhe bulaliya hota!”


“Haan…nahi! Matlab…akele- akele nahi gaya tha. Vidhi… Vidhi bhi chali thi mere saath.” Suddenly giving up on his attempt to converse, he stepped back. “Ma, I’m tired. We’ll talk tomorrow?” 


“Dev?”  His feet halted. “Kya hua beta? Kuch baat hue Vidhi se?” 


Satyavati watched her son battle with himself, trying to suppress the words that were bursting to get out. But she was his mother. She could outwait him when it mattered. Finally, his shoulders slumped as he lost the battle. “She wants to tell her parents,” he growled, his abrasive tone low. Frustrated. 


Satyavati’s eyes lit up. She held his arm eagerly. “Sach? Usne aisa kaha tujhse?”


“Woh-woh meri baat nahi maan rahi hain ma! Buss bolti hain ki samajh jayenge! Aise-aise thodi na hota hain!” He shook his head in frustrated despair.


“Kyu nahi hosakta Dev? If she wants to talk to her parents, that means she is sure about herself, her feelings for you. Aur kya pata…”


“Ma, now you’re daydreaming too?” He scoffed. “In what world would a parent…any parent accept such a thing?” 


“Dev, koshish toh karni chahiye na. Warna…”


“Warna kya ma? Mein bol bolke thak gaya hoon ki iss rish…yeh-yeh jo bhi hain, uss…usmein koi future nahi hain.” But for the first time, he couldn’t utter those words with conviction. The gentle smile of his mom attested to that. “Ma, I’m tired. We… We’ll talk tomorrow, OK? Goodnight.” 


Satyavati watched her son walk away. “Future hain, Dev. Yeh tu bhi jaanne laga hain. Dikhraha hain mujhe. Buss tumhe uss future ki taraf apne kadam badhana hain.” 


Dev’s plans to catch some shut eye flew out of the window by the time he came out of the shower and saw 2 missed calls from Vidhi. Frowning, he called her back. She answered almost before it began ringing. “Vidhi? Kya hua? Sab teek?”


“S-sir… s-sir…woh…papa… mere papa…sir…” 


“Vidhi, Vidhi! Calm down! Just calm down. Bolo kya hua!” He made his tone as soothing as possible under the circumstances because his gut was screaming at him that whatever it was, it was not good. 


“S-sir mere papa…unhe kuch hogaya hain. W-woh behosh hogaye hain. A-ambulance bulaya hain…”


“OK, OK. Relax. Hua kya tha usse pehle?”


“Woh…unko pata chalgaya ki…m-mein aap…matlab aap aur mein…”


Dev squeezed his eyes shut. Dammit! Dammit all to hell! He bloody told her not to open her mouth. Not to say anything. “Vidhi, I told you…”


“N-nahi, meine kuch nahi bataya…matlab bataya lekin…meine nahi bataya. Un-unhonne poocha toh…”


If there was one thing that Dev Raichand was good at, it was setting priorities and following through them. “OK, meri baat suno ab. I’m sending you the name of the hospital. Tell the ambulance guy to take your papa there. Are you listening to me? I know the doctors there. I’ll call and tell them to expect you. They will take care of him. Nothing will happen. Suna tumne Vidhi? Kuch nahi hoga tumhare papa ko. Mein hoon na. Sab sambhal loonga.”


“N-nahi sir.” He could almost see her shaking her head rapidly, wiping her tears with the back of her hand. “Woh badi hospital hogi na…matlab hum kaise…how do I…”


The nerve ticking at his jaw was the only sign of his eroding temper. “Vidhi, this is not the time to think about that. I said I will…” He exhaled, his mind functioning at warp speed. “You are my employee. Employees and their family have health insurance in our company. You know that.” He could hear the ambulance siren in the background. “Go now.”


She disconnected the call without saying anything further. He pushed that to the back of his mind as he made the calls to the hospital and talked to the doctors and later to the HR team to make sure the insurance papers were updated and in place. He told them to send the copies to Vidhi and coordinate with the hospital admin. 


“Don’t worry sir. We’ll handle it,” he assured. 


“Thank you. And if any part of the treatment is not covered by our policy, don’t mention it to Vidhi now. We’ll deal with it later, OK? Keep me updated.”


“Sure sir.” 


Throwing the phone aside on the bed, he went to stand at the window. 


“Aap bhagwaan banke aaye hain Dev saab, Vidhi keliye!” 


He recalled Hari Prasad’s words. I’m sorry, Hari Prasad ji. Mein bhagwaan nahi, ek shraap banke aaya hoon aapki beti ki zindagi mein. I’m so sorry. 


“Agar koi cheez mumkin hain toh woh hain humaara saath hona!” 


Vidhi’s words resonated. He shook his head. 


Nahi Vidhi, yeh mumkin nahi hain. Ab toh tumhe bhi yakeen hojaayega ki yeh mumkin nahi hain. You will now let go of this…whatever it is in your heart. You will let go of me. It’s the right thing to do. The only thing to do. They are your parents. What parent would accept this? They live in a society. And society… society would forever mock and ridicule things that are not as per the pre-set norms. 


He looked at his left palm, felt her palm sliding through his, entwining them together. How stupid was he! How could he, for even one moment, forget that he had no right to want…to hope? He was not a teenager, was he? Not a young man full of youthful optimism, was he? No. He had no right to hope. Not with her. Not with his Vidhi. No. Not His Vidhi. Just Vidhi. She is not his to claim. Why did he forget that? Because he did forget. Even as he mouthed the facts to Vidhi and his ma, he did forget. Somewhere inside his heart, he began to hope. To think that maybe it is possible. Maybe it would work out. Maybe he could have her all to himself. All those smiles, that guileless laughter, that eager exuberance, all that love that seemed to surround and drown him whenever he felt her near him… all to himself. Him alone. 


Dev Raichand has become senile and stupid, he concluded. 


Stretching out on the bed, he closed his tired eyes. But his mind refused to stay silent. She didn’t say anything before ending the call. Was this the last time he would be hearing her voice? Had today been the last time he would ever see her? It wouldn’t be, right? She has a job. She accepted the scholarship. He would get to see her. Yes, he would, he massaged his chest, trying to reassure his heart. OK, maybe not at close quarters. She wouldn’t be coming to his cabin at every little chance she got. Her face wouldn’t light up whenever she spotted him. Her eyes wouldn’t adore him whenever he said or did something the least bit good or helpful. But still…he would be able to see her. It would be enough. It would HAVE to be. But what if she never came back? What if today had indeed been the last time he saw her? 


A lone tear trickled down to the side of his forehead, disappearing in his salt-pepper hair. “Don’t go, Vidhi!” The still, silent night was the only one that heard his agonized whimper. 


Le ja mujhe saath tere Mujhko na rehna saath mere

I hate crying....u made me cry....I just hate u 1000000

And love u devsmiley27

Posted: 1 months ago

yaar itna dard bhara likhne ko kisne kaha tha... dil tut gaya dev ki ue halat dekh ke...💔💔💔💔💔


how beautifully you summed his emotions... and how painfully i read it all in one breath (may be 3 or 4) 

but ek happy wala likhna please... show  bhi rula raha and tum bhi... ek happy wala please next time 


Na Umra Ki Seema Ho 


Related Topics

doc-text Topics pencil Author stackexchange Replies eye Views clock Last Post Reply
Humnava mere-VM on ViDev ❤️

pencil Angel_Shweta   stackexchange 7   eye 314

Angel_Shweta 7 314 29 days ago Fanzzz
OS: Kuch Reet Jagat ki Aisi Hain...

pencil Suvika.   stackexchange 17   eye 743

Suvika. 17 743 1 months ago plmzaq
Mere dil kee awaaz ( Short poem)

pencil Revutty   stackexchange 13   eye 308

Revutty 13 308 1 months ago Revutty

Topic Info

11 Participants 27 Replies 943Views

Topic started by Suvika.

Last replied by Saumya19

loader
loader
up-open TOP