Starry-eyed GenNow gives studies a miss

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Posted: 16 years ago

Very interesting...i thought of all Vinit fans while reading this

Calcutta, March 5: For every Debojit Saha, Abhijeet Sawant and Ruprekha Banerjee who makes it to fame and fortune via the reality TV route, there are thousands of youngsters who dream of emulating them, often ignoring their studies in the process.

And such is pull of stardom and big bucks among the campus crowd that psychiatrists, teachers and parents have been forced to devise strategies to burst the bubble without denting the self-confidence of the teenagers.

While the schools fret about the increasing obsession of students with television talent hunts, parents of many teenagers have been forced to seek the help of psychiatrists.

"The number of teenagers pursuing instant stardom has gone up. Most of these cases come to the fore as the examinations approach and the children continue neglecting their studies. There is a glut of cases this season, too," says city-based psychiatrist Aniruddha Deb. "After talking to the teenagers, we find that they strongly believe they possess the mettle to be the next Abhijeet Sawant or Ruprekha Banerjee and shows like Indian Idol and Fame Gurukul are their shortcuts to success."

But even for the winners of reality shows, it is long, hard struggle to stardom. Abhijeet Sawant, the first Indian Idol, tells The Telegraph: "I wish that the behind-the-scenes of Indian Idol are also telecast. Everyone must know the tremendous hard work that the participants put in. One has to stay away from family and friends for months and deal with the pressure of competition and that of constantly being in the public eye. I would advise youngsters to concentrate on their studies and take part in the talent hunts only if they are immensely gifted."

Lack of talent, however, is seldom an impediment to grand dreams.

"Most cases that come to us are of teenagers with stars in their eyes, but who do not possess the talent to excel in the reality shows. It is difficult for parents and even professionals to make them see things objectively. One might just end up hurting their self-esteem," states child psychiatrist Rima Mukherjee.

Posted: 16 years ago
LOL

Yes I read it int he Telegraph few days back. And even then I was laughing.

Chalo Gajendraji after filling out the pockets of Zee, Phne companies and himself is now helping out the psychiatrists too. Wink


Posted: 16 years ago
Good one temasek - nice find  ClapClap

Originally posted by temasek


Very interesting...i thought of all Vinit fans while reading this

Calcutta, March 5: For every Debojit Saha, Abhijeet Sawant and Ruprekha Banerjee who makes it to fame and fortune via the reality TV route, there are thousands of youngsters who dream of emulating them, often ignoring their studies in the process.

And such is pull of stardom and big bucks among the campus crowd that psychiatrists, teachers and parents have been forced to devise strategies to burst the bubble without denting the self-confidence of the teenagers.

While the schools fret about the increasing obsession of students with television talent hunts, parents of many teenagers have been forced to seek the help of psychiatrists.

"The number of teenagers pursuing instant stardom has gone up. Most of these cases come to the fore as the examinations approach and the children continue neglecting their studies. There is a glut of cases this season, too," says city-based psychiatrist Aniruddha Deb. "After talking to the teenagers, we find that they strongly believe they possess the mettle to be the next Abhijeet Sawant or Ruprekha Banerjee and shows like Indian Idol and Fame Gurukul are their shortcuts to success."

But even for the winners of reality shows, it is long, hard struggle to stardom. Abhijeet Sawant, the first Indian Idol, tells The Telegraph: "I wish that the behind-the-scenes of Indian Idol are also telecast. Everyone must know the tremendous hard work that the participants put in. One has to stay away from family and friends for months and deal with the pressure of competition and that of constantly being in the public eye. I would advise youngsters to concentrate on their studies and take part in the talent hunts only if they are immensely gifted."

Lack of talent, however, is seldom an impediment to grand dreams.

"Most cases that come to us are of teenagers with stars in their eyes, but who do not possess the talent to excel in the reality shows. It is difficult for parents and even professionals to make them see things objectively. One might just end up hurting their self-esteem," states child psychiatrist Rima Mukherjee.

Posted: 16 years ago
Thanks soulsoup...I only thank God that there were no reality shows when I was a teenager...its very easy to get swayed by this...and abhilash..u are right..there should be a minimum age LOL
Posted: 16 years ago

Originally posted by Bhaskar.T


LOL

Yes I read it int he Telegraph few days back. And even then I was laughing.

Chalo Gajendraji after filling out the pockets of Zee, Phne companies and himself is now helping out the psychiatrists too. Wink


LOL  

Posted: 16 years ago
More than minimum age, I think there must be a basic qualification. Like it doesnt matter if you are young, but say if you have finished Gr 12, then you can take part.

Why the less age for girls? Girls can give up their studies when they are 19 and boys can continue uptil they are 21 ?! That is ridiculous! If there is a set age, then it should be the same for every1..

there should also be a cut off age that if you are keeping 21 + singers, the singer must not be older than 30. Its really unfair especially in competitions like Indian Idol where performance is the key and u have some senior citizens going for auditions :S

I still think age isn't a good measure. Its very easy to fake a birthcertificate in India !!

Besides, if there was an age barrier, we wouldnt have been fortunate enough to hear Hema , Nihira, Himani, Ujjaini, Vinit, Twinkle and Sharib who were all minors.
Posted: 16 years ago
And as for people who come without a basic education, see their background! No harm in finding out who they are or what they do. If you are publically using their sad story as a publicity stunt, use it for takin the contestants as well. But yes, a basic education is a MUST.
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